The Baltimore Theater Project Building

People love to come to Baltimore for entertainment. There are many museums, concert venues, festivals, and other events for everyone to enjoy. One theater building seems to have multiple performances for just about anyone, including one performer who is still fascinating audiences from the other side.

The History of the Building


Baltimore Theatre Project, located in Mount Vernon at 45 West Preston Street, is established in a building with history that dates beyond the theater organization. It was built in 1883 originally as a meeting place for the Improved Order of Heptasoths. The mens fraternity owned the building until 1924 when Farson’s Dance Academy took over. Farson’s became a popular dance hall that lasted until the 1950s when it became a recreation center. Afterwards it was purchased by Centerstage who used it until they outgrew the location. Baltimore Theater Project made it their establishment in 1971. The building was renovated in 1972, 1985, and in 1994.

A Ghostly Pianist


Despite the ownership changes and renovations, one thing that never seemed to change was the mysterious pianist seen throughout the years in the building. People that have seen him describe him as a very tall man that wears an old fashion suit that resembles the clothing of the 20s era. It is believed he has come from the time the building was Farsons and he often plays Schubert. He can also be heard in the rehearsal room playing the piano. Performers would book the room to rehearse only to report that someone had stolen their rehearsal time to play the piano. He does not seem to have a preference on which piano he plays either. More modern pianos and keyboards have also mysteriously played by themselves. The main piano, which is on wheels, has also been known to relocate itself.

References


Baltimore Theatre Project. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://www.theatreproject.org/AboutUs/HistoryOfTheIOHBuilding/

Chalkley, T., Cohen, C., & Jensen, B. (2000) Baltimore’s Ghost Stories to Tingle Your Spine [Electronic Version]. Baltimore Or Less retrieved from http://www.baltimoreorless.com/2012/01/baltimores-ghost-stories-to-tingle-your-spine/

Macken, L. (2004). Haunted Baltimore: Charm City Spirits.Black Cat Press. Forked River, NJ.

Okonowicz, E. (2004). Baltimore Ghosts: History, Mystery, Legends and Lore. Myst and Lace Publishers. Elkton, MD

Okonowicz, E. (2010). The Big Book of Maryland Ghost Stories. Stackpole Books. Mechanicsburg, PA